10 EXCUSES FOR MISSING WORK

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We all tend to wanna miss work from time to time right? When you miss, do you normally have a bad excuse or a good one? Here’s Eric Scott Radio’s 10 excuses for missing work!

Smart Excuses

I’ve Earned It: No one can argue with performance. Come in two or three hours early — or stay late — for a week or two. Then negotiate a day off in advance. “Really work when you’re there, so you’ll be able to feel good about taking time off,” says Andrea Nierenberg, president of The Nierenberg Group, a management consulting and personal marketing practice.

I’m Playing Golf with a Client: For this one to work, you’ve got to have a job that requires you to meet and court current and prospective clients. Neil Simpkins, an account executive at Oxford Communications, has used this one successfully. One note of caution: Meet the client; don’t just say you did.

I Have a Doctor’s Appointment: This excuse will get you out of work for a half-day or so. Make the appointment first thing in the morning or late in the day, say around 3 p.m. You can leave the office by 2:30 p.m. and get home (hopefully) by 4 p.m. The shortened day will help you recharge, especially if you schedule it on a Friday afternoon.

I Have Cramps: Before you dismiss this one, think about it: Who can argue? “It’s such an embarrassing topic that nobody will ever challenge it,” says Jennifer Newman, vice president of Lippe Taylor Public Relations. She has used this excuse — and had it used on her — successfully. “It’s one of those things that men honestly have no clue about, and women can sympathize with,.” One important point: Don’t use this one if you’re a man. It’ll never work.

I’m Working from Home: This is an excellent way to give yourself a break if your company allows it. Although you’ll need to do some work at home, you can generally get away with a shortened day. And you’ll eliminate your commuting time.

Not-So-Smart Excuses

There’s a Death in the Family: Don’t ever use this excuse if it’s not true. Your employer will lose all trust in you. “I had an employee whose mother died — twice,” says David Wear, a Virginia PR executive. “He also had the misfortune of losing all his grandparents — 12 of them — during a two-year period.”

I’m Too Sleepy: When she was a manager at IBM, Marilynn Mobley heard it all. This one still makes her laugh: The employee apparently took Tylenol 3 with codeine instead of a vitamin, because the bottles looked alike.

I Can’t Get My Car Out of the Garage: This is another one that Mobley didn’t buy. An employee said that a power failure was preventing him from opening his power-operated garage door. “I reminded him that there’s a pull chain on it for just such cases,” she says.

I Can’t Find My Polling Place: Mary Dale Walters, a communications specialist at CCH, couldn’t believe this one. A former employee needed an entire day to figure out where she had to go to vote in the presidential election.

I Have a Personal Emergency: This one is so vague that it rarely works. It could mean anything from fatigue to an appointment with your hairdresser, and your boss knows it.

 

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